11:37 / 09.07.2020
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Why is Uzbekistan returning to the strict quarantine regime? Expert answers

On July 8, a briefing was held at the Agency for Information and Mass Communications with the participation of representatives from the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

According to Kun.uz correspondent, during the event, a member of the staff for the fight against coronavirus at the Health Ministry, Professor Khabibulla Okilov told why Uzbekistan is returning to the strict quarantine regime.

“On March 15, the first coronavirus case was registered in Uzbekistan. Tough quarantine measures were announced on March 16. At that time, we studied foreign experience, prepared a sufficient number of beds. First, quarantine was organized in sanatoriums, then a special town was built,” he said.

The expert noted that all medical resources were aimed at combating COVID-19.

“However, after easing the measures, many people have ceased to comply with the rules. The number of patients is growing every day. We are running out of resources now. The beds are full. All doctors work for 14 days and then are being quarantined. There are no doctors left, there are no vacant beds,” he said.

Based on the above problems, the relevant departments proposed to resume strict quarantine in Uzbekistan.

“The Special Republican Commission accepted our proposals. Asymptomatic patients were allowed to be treated at home, quarantine can be carried out in hotels, but even in this case, we do not have vacant beds. Stationary seats are full,” Khabibulla Okilov said.

The expert emphasized that due to the increase in the number of patients with coronavirus, other residents who suffer from other chronic diseases have corresponding problems.

“If we do not introduce tough quarantine now, the situation will worsen. 300 people are found to have coronavirus per day, the total number of patients is 11 thousand. That is why the Special Commission made such a decision,” he said.

Khabibulla Okilov also expressed his opinion on statistics.

“Every day the number of patients is increasing by 350 people. These are the statistics we know. We do not yet have accurate data on asymptomatic carriers. There may be two to three times more,” the professor noted.

He also said that due to the sharp increase in the number of patients, there are not enough tests at places.

“There is a lack of 20-22 thousand tests per day. Previously, the results were ready in a few hours, now it takes several days,” he said.

He earnestly asked all citizens to comply with quarantine rules.

“If the situation worsens and 500, 1,000 or 1,500 patients are identified every day, then this will be a collapse. The system will not be able to withstand such a load,” Khabibulla Okilov concluded.

Earlier, it was reported that from July 10 to August 1 in Uzbekistan, the activities of a number of enterprises would be banned.

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